Wednesday, 2 May 2018

French Indian War

Game = Sharps Practice II
Setting = French Indian War

Scenario = The one where someone goes from one end of the table to the other guarding something.

Victor = French

The game was brief.
One side marched down the table as fast as possible. In a march column.



The other side infested a wood and shot at them.




One plan didn't survive contact with the enemy but there was no alteration.






Shock and casualties proved too much.



Tuesday, 24 April 2018

Lasalle Napoleonic Wargame

Last night saw Mick's Brits visit my place to take on my French.

We both ran Penisula Armies - except for my Young Guard brigade that I wanted to use as they had never graced the table before.


Here is the overall set up. I chose a table that I knew would limit the avenues for attack. Mick further constricted this space with the additional defender terrain choices. 


Mick prepared to defend the objective. His large elite unit would play a key role in this. 


My plan consisted of a strong attack on the British left with my Young Guard brigade. I never really untangled these guys for the devastating assault I had planned. I also relied that Mick's reserve dragoons may arrive too late to play a role. 


My main attack forces streamed forward in columns. I needed troops at the front so I was forced to accept some would have to march through the woods that extended 2 feet into the table. 


Mick had his defences prepared and awaited the onslaught. One of his battalions on the right of the image was instructed with holding a gap against the flank attack. 


The Guard massed to overwhelm this battalion. Alas I relied on cannons causing damage - but his plentiful skirmishers reduced their effect - rather than charging straight in. 

I should add here we trialed a rule suggested on the forum - whose aim was to allow lines to effectively deal with attack columns - that allowed only a single unit to charge an enemy on each occasion. Lasalle makes it a bit easy to go steaming in with two columns on a single line and overwhelm it. This seemed to work quite well. I also allowed lines to inflict two disruptions on a column when firing for achieving 4 hits rather than 5 - hard but possible. 


The brave defenders awaiting for the Young Guard to figure out their attack. 


The front lines. Attack columns went in piecemeal due to the restrictive terrain and the march through the woods. 


The French plan (dream?) received a blow ... the British dragoon brigade arrives far too early. Turn 4 I think? 


But the dragoons themselves only had a narrow gap ahead to strike at the French. 


The Guard inch closer trying not to block the guns. Even though these were heavy guns they fail to place significant damage on the British. Any hit was rallied off by their high espirit. 


The dragoons come on. Before them (on the flank of the French) were a single battalion of conscripts who quickly formed square. 


Mick came forward as both sides threw their troops forward in repeated charges. The British made several holes in the French line (see left of image) but these were plugged by the French reserves. 

Artillery on both sides remained disappointing as both players struggled to best position these troops. 


Hold lads, hold! (They did by the way ... to the end.) 


The breakthrough came in the seventh turn but all too late. The Young Guard brigade was not able to turn its numerical and morale advantage into a battle winning edge. The sun was sinking fast now (and it was getting late as Mick and I had both decided to attend the Anzac Day dawn service the next day.) Some lucky rolls could have seen the French take another couple of battalions in combat ... 


But this did not occur. We called the game with a Young Guard battalion steaming toward the objective but just too far away. Two batteries stood in its way and Mick could have very easily turned his cavalry to contest the objective. 

The sun dipped below the horizon with the French divisional commander forced to report back to corps headquarters his objectives for the day had not been attained. The British would slip away with minimal losses pleased in the knowledge they had done their duty well. Neither side suffered significant casualties (2 Brits to 4 French battalions) but the French need a better way to pass through and around terrain to get to grips with the foe. A chat to the Emperor about correct laying of the guns wouldn't hurt either. 


Monday, 23 April 2018

Savage Africa with Damp Parts


The Turkish slavers make their way through the bush. 


Faster or I shall feed you to the jackals!


The toll for this road shall be taken in blood ... and flesh for the pot. 


Was that a warning? Is this the right way?


Lady Fanny, Halt! I heard something ... 


The expedition were spread out across the rapids when the natives struck. 


Crocodiles await in the river. 


Professor Hardwig and his trusty boy await their turn across the rapids.


Please note in the last two images ... the damp parts. My new swamps. Not the best photo as I needed to take something from above to show the murky nature of the "water." But a very reflective surface with a low profile that I'm happy with. Now my brain tells me I should just do 4 more. 


Sunday, 22 April 2018

Jungle Table

So ... how much jungle have you actually got?

This is a question I asked myself about an hour ago.

This much. Table is 6 x 4.



There are 9 medium sized jungle areas on the table. Approx 10" long and 6" wide. 




It looks thicker in person. 


Flash Your Dark Ages!

Well, I have got them and these aren't very good images of ... them .... erm ... 

I was going to do a Lion Rampant battle report but then ... I didn't.


This unit I would use as Viking Huscarls. I want to increase the unit size to 8 in my Lion Rampant variant games just for appearance. I don't intend - atm - to change the unit size in the game - will still function at 6. 


Bondi fresh off the longships. I like to have a front rank of mailed warriors backed up by warriors in tunics and often without helms. 


How did these guys get into another snap? A better image of the Viking general I like to call "Eric Bloodaxe" (or Anlaf) in the background. 


More Viking bondi. I like grouping similar shielded models into a single unit. To my mind this could have been a way that such warriors in this period distinguished themselves and built morale and displayed communal spirit. 


More huscarls behind - these with dane axe. 


The good guys - err - Saxons. A units of thegns. Ready to die for their lord - shown behind on the barrow - and make good their oaths sworn in the mead hall. The lamb and cross will protect them. 


More thegns. Monks in the rear. They've got a piece of the true cross you know. Been handed down since Mount Badon when Arthur very carelessly kept charging people with it. 


Now to the fyrd. Same idea as the Vikings - mail to the front with similar shield patterns to mark specific groups. 


Nope, not the same unit. I do like red/white for the Saxons. 


From behind the Viking line. Across the ford ... to plunder ... I mean glory!


A slave - skulking from a flogging - peers through the trees at the war hedge. Will the Saxons triumph?